October102012
Ben digging for gold…

Ben digging for gold…

10PM
Feeling parsnipitty?

Feeling parsnipitty?

September272012
Tis’ the season for beets!

September has flown by. The cooling weather; leaves becoming shades of gold, auburn, and then russet; crisp air and fast paced working. It must be fall! 

Last Saturday marked the official first day of fall. The hustle of the season has become more of a stride. Daily chores of duck feeding and herding are coming to a close. The relief of 24weeks of everyday duck care is being lifted from us and transformed into our very own (frozen) product. While I sit here writing, the ducks are being processed. Currently, we outsource our processing from a mobile unit that travels around the Northeast. By Saturday, the freezers will be packed.

The loss of duck responsibilities brings on another seasonal project. Come Monday, Ben and I will begin vinegar production. The new brewing system, that we put together, suits our needs for a closed fermentation system. Using large food grade fermentation vessels allows us to make 55 gallons of wine every 3-4 days. After the primary fermentation, when the majority of yeast has been consumed, we will transfer the wine to a 250 gallon holding tank. There the vinegar magic will happen. Stay tuned for pictures!

Tis’ the season for beets!

September has flown by. The cooling weather; leaves becoming shades of gold, auburn, and then russet; crisp air and fast paced working. It must be fall!

Last Saturday marked the official first day of fall. The hustle of the season has become more of a stride. Daily chores of duck feeding and herding are coming to a close. The relief of 24weeks of everyday duck care is being lifted from us and transformed into our very own (frozen) product. While I sit here writing, the ducks are being processed. Currently, we outsource our processing from a mobile unit that travels around the Northeast. By Saturday, the freezers will be packed.

The loss of duck responsibilities brings on another seasonal project. Come Monday, Ben and I will begin vinegar production. The new brewing system, that we put together, suits our needs for a closed fermentation system. Using large food grade fermentation vessels allows us to make 55 gallons of wine every 3-4 days. After the primary fermentation, when the majority of yeast has been consumed, we will transfer the wine to a 250 gallon holding tank. There the vinegar magic will happen. Stay tuned for pictures!

3PM
Washing carrots with the almighty root washer.

Washing carrots with the almighty root washer.

August52012

With the introduction of August, Gadabout Farm is in full swing. Culinary herbs have been a huge success. Curly parsley, oregano, cilantro, and chives have begun to dress plates at many restaurants in the area. They are by far Kaitlyn’s favorite thing to harvest!

Vegetables are also harvested for two weekly deliveries. On Tuesdays and Fridays we venture to Burlington, Essex, and Stowe to deliver early cabbage, carrots, kale, chard, garlic, green onions, green beans, potatoes, and salad turnips. Since we focus on late season crops, our busy harvest time is just approaching. Soon enough more roots, cured onions, winter squash, and other fall festive crops will be available.

Our project list of growing while the season is nearing the final stretch. In the next few weeks we will be fermenting saurkraut and kimchi for farmers markets and to support Rockville Market Farm’s CSA. Thereafter, beets will be ready for juicing. The juice will be used to create 50 gallon batches of beet carrot wine. After the primary fermentation, we will transfer the wine into a secondary vat. This is where the vinegar magic happens! This year we aim to create 500 gallons for sale.

The young ducklings that arrived in early April have been processed into a delicious product that we are all craving. We have tasted our creation in a variety of ways at Bluebird Tavern in Burlington. Last week we were served a tender duck breast served over wilted kale with micro greens, and topped with an amazing blueberry glaze. They also serve a popular duck burger and duck comfit in a variety of ways. We are pleased with their preparation and presentation.

June12012

A lot has taken place over the past few weeks. So much, I can’t seem to recall or recap the days.

What I do want to provide are a few highlights. As our productivity increases, so has our interaction with the public. Last weekend, we participated in our first farmers market in Shelburne. On a gorgeous May day, it is fairly easy to be a vendor. Most vendors, including us, sold out last Saturday. On our menu was chicken salad sandwiches on portuguese sweet bread and kombucha tea. We were proud of our final product and can’t wait to share it with more folks as the season progresses.

Two weeks ago we received a home cetering license. This gives us the ability to prepare foods in a sanitary home environment. With a few minor adjustments to our kitchen, we made it possible to be a true purveyor of prepared foods.

Last weekend, Ben’s folks came into town. They lent a strong hand in the fields. In one day, we planted over an acre of vegetables! Some of them included: kraut cabbage, potatoes, green beans, and winter squash.Thanks Glenn & Susan

Soon our firsts harvests will be ready and more farmers markets will come!

Stay tuned for more updates.

April292012

     As the season takes it’s course we’ve been working towards establishing our spring crops and our final crop plan for the year. Eric and Keenan at Rockville Market Farm have offered shared greenhouse space for us to use. Ben is pictured above with our early cabbage crop among others planted by us and Rockville Market folks. Our early focuses this year will be salad turnips and herbs. So far, we’ve planted parsley, chives, oregano, and cilantro. 

       Last week, we successfully reached our Kickstarter goal of $4,000. This funding opportunity will give us the leverage to purchase major equipment for the beet vinegar business. One of the most time consuming aspects of producing root crops is washing. Barrel washers are used to clean large quantities of root crops. (500lbs per hour) This is a worthy efficiency to invest in. Check out this short clip of others using a barrel washer.

April242012

Our first batch of Muscovy ducklings and Cornish crosses arrived last week. They’ve quickly adapted to their new home and are growing fast. There are 11 more weeks of “duck parenthood.” Check back for more pictures as they become less cute.

← Older entries Page 1 of 2